Emergency Management Training

This guideline indicates what classes are required for each level of Federal, State, Local, Tribal, Private Sector and Non-Governmental Personnel.

Audience Required Training

Federal/State/Local/Tribal/Private Sector & Non-governmental personnel to include:

Entry level first responders & disaster workers

• Emergency Medical Service personnel
• Firefighters
• Hospital staff
• Law Enforcement personnel
• Public Health personnel
• Public Works/Utility personnel
• Skilled Support Personnel
• Other emergency management response, support, volunteer personnel at all levels
• ICS-100: Introduction to ICS or equivalent
 
• FEMA IS-700: NIMS, An Introduction

Federal/State/Local/Tribal/Private Sector & Non-governmental personnel to include:

First line supervisors, single resource leaders, field supervisors, and other emergency management/response personnel that require a higher level of ICS/NIMS Training.

• ICS-100: Introduction to ICS or equivalent
 
• ICS-200: Basic ICS or equivalent
 
• FEMA IS-700: NIMS, An Introduction

Federal/State/Local/Tribal/Private Sector & Nongovernmental personnel to include:


Required: Mid-level management including strike team leaders, task force leaders, unit leaders, division/group supervisors, branch directors, and;

Recommended: Emergency operations center staff.

• ICS-100: Introduction to ICS or equivalent
• ICS-200: Basic ICS or equivalent
• ICS-300: Intermediate ICS or equivalent
• FEMA IS-700: NIMS, An Introduction
• FEMA IS-800.A: National Response Plan

(NRP), An Introduction*

Federal/State/Local/Tribal/Private Sector & Nongovernmental personnel to include:


Required: Command and general staff, select department heads with multi-agency coordination system responsibilities, area commanders, emergency managers, and;

Recommended: Emergency operations center managers.

• ICS-100: Introduction to ICS or equivalent
• ICS-200: Basic ICS or equivalent
• ICS-300: Intermediate ICS or equivalent
• ICS-400: Advanced ICS or equivalent
• FEMA IS-700: NIMS, An Introduction
• FEMA IS-800.A: National Response

Plan (NRP), An Introduction*

The following is a list of all Emergency Management Courses available.  By clicking on each of the courses listed you will be re-directed to the full description.

Incident Command System (ICS-100.a) (6 hours)
Introduction to the Incident Command System

Incident Command System (ICS-100.LEa) (6 hours)
Introduction to the Incident Command System for Law Enforcement

Incident Command System (ICS-100.SCa) (6 hours)
Introduction to the Incident Command System for Schools

Incident Command System (ICS-100.PWa) (6 hours)
Introduction to the Incident Command System for Public Works Personn
el

Incident Command System (ICS-200.a) (6 hours)
Single Resources and Initial Action Incidents for ICS

Incident Command System (ICS-300) (18 Hours)
Intermediate Incident Command System

Incident Command System (ICS-324) (4 hours)
Community Hurricane Preparedness

Incident Command System (ICS-400) (14 hours)
Advanced Incident Command System

Incident Command System (IS-700) (4 hours)
National Incident Management System

Incident Command System (IS-701) (16 hours)
NIMS Multiagency Coordination Systems

Incident Command System (IS-702) (4 hours)
NIMS Public Information

Incident Command System (IS-703) (16 hours)
NIMS Resource Management

Incident Command System (IS-704) (6 hours)
NIMS Communication and Information Management

Incident Command System (IS-705) (12 hours)
NIMS Preparedness

Incident Command System (IS-706) (3 hours)
NIMS Intrastate Mutual Aid, An Introduction

Incident Command System (IS-707) (4 hours)
NIMS Resource Typing

Incident Command System (IS-800.B) (4 hours)
National Response Plan

Incident Command System (IS-1900) (4 hours)
NDMS Federal Coordinating Center Operations Course

Incident Command System (ICS-100.a) (6 hours)
Introduction to the Incident Command System

Course Overview

ICS 100, Introduction to the Incident Command System, introduces the Incident Command System (ICS) and provides the foundation for higher level ICS training. This course describes the history, features and principles, and organizational structure of the Incident Command System. It also explains the relationship between ICS and the National Incident Management System (NIMS).

Audience

It is incumbent upon Federal, State, tribal, and local emergency management/response personnel to determine who within their organizations requires ICS-100 training, based on local incident management organizational planning.

  • Responder level—emergency response providers and disaster workers, entry level to managerial level, including emergency medical service personnel; firefighters; medical personnel; police officers; public health personnel; public work/utility personnel; and other emergency management response personnel
  • Typically, all Federal, State, tribal, local, private-sector, and nongovernmental personnel at the following levels of responsibility in emergency management

Course Objectives

Incident Command System (ICS-100.LEa) (6 hours)
Introduction to the Incident Command System for Law Enforcement

Course Overview

ICS 100.LEa, Introduction to the Incident Command System for Law Enforcement, introduces the Incident Command System (ICS) and provides the foundation for higher level ICS training. This course describes the history, features and principles, and organizational structure of the Incident Command System. It also explains the relationship between ICS and the National Incident Management System (NIMS). This course uses the same objectives and content as other ICS 100 courses with law enforcement examples and exercises.

Course Objectives

  • Purpose of ICS: Identify requirements to use ICS, three purposes of ICS, and common incident tasks.
  • Basic Features of ICS: Describe the basic features of ICS.
  • Incident Commander and Command Staff Functions: Describe the role and function of the incident commander and Command Staff.
  • General Staff Functions: Describe the role and function of the Operations, Planning, Logistics and Finance/Administration sections.
  • Facilities: Describe the six basic ICS facilities, identify facilities that may be located together, and identify facility map symbols.
  • Common Responsibilities: Describe common mobilization responsibilities and common responsibilities at an incident, list individual accountability and responsibilities, and describe

 

Incident Command System (ICS-100.SCa) (6 hours)
Introduction to the Incident Command System for Schools

Course Overview

The Emergency Management Institute developed the Introduction to ICS for Schools (IS-100.SCa for Schools) course in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Education.  The course is designed primarily for kindergarten through high school personnel.

The overall course goal is to promote school safety by:

  1. Familiarizing you with how ICS principles can be applied in school-based incidents.
  2. Preparing you to interface with community response personnel

IS-100.SCa for Schools follows the National Incident Management System (NIMS) guidelines.

Course Objectives

  • Purpose of ICS: Identify requirements to use ICS, three purposes of ICS, and common incident tasks.
  • Basic Features of ICS: Describe the basic features of ICS.
  • Incident Commander and Command Staff Functions: Describe the role and function of the incident commander and Command Staff.
  • General Staff Functions: Describe the role and function of the Operations, Planning, Logistics and Finance/Administration sections.
  • Facilities: Describe the six basic ICS facilities, identify facilities that may be located together, and identify facility map symbols.
  • Common Responsibilities: Describe common mobilization responsibilities and common responsibilities at an incident, list individual accountability and responsibilities, and describe


Incident Command System (ICS-100.PWa)
(6 hours)
Introduction to the Incident Command System for Public Works Personnel

Course Overview

ICS 100.PWa, Introduction to the Incident Command System for Public Works, introduces the Incident Command System (ICS) and provides the foundation for higher level ICS training. This course describes the history, features and principles, and organizational structure of the Incident Command System. It also explains the relationship between ICS and the National Incident Management System (NIMS). This course uses the same objectives and content as other ICS 100 courses with public works examples and exercises.

Course Objectives

  • Purpose of ICS: Identify requirements to use ICS, three purposes of ICS, and common incident tasks.
  • Basic Features of ICS: Describe the basic features of ICS.
  • Incident Commander and Command Staff Functions: Describe the role and function of the incident commander and Command Staff.
  • General Staff Functions: Describe the role and function of the Operations, Planning, Logistics and Finance/Administration sections.
  • Facilities: Describe the six basic ICS facilities, identify facilities that may be located together, and identify facility map symbols.
  • Common Responsibilities: Describe common mobilization responsibilities and common responsibilities at an incident, list individual accountability and responsibilities, and describe


Incident Command System (ICS-200.a)
(6 hours)
Single Resources and Initial Action Incidents for ICS

Course Overview:

ICS 200 is designed to enable personnel to operate efficiently during an incident or event within the Incident Command System (ICS). ICS-200 provides training on and resources for personnel who are likely to assume a supervisory position within the ICS.

Audience

  • It is incumbent upon Federal, State, tribal, and local emergency management/response personnel to determine who within their organizations requires ICS-200 training, based on local incident management organizational planning.
  • Typically, all Federal, State, tribal, local, private-sector, and nongovernmental personnel at the following levels of responsibility in emergency management and incident response operations: first-line supervisor, mid-level management and command and general staff.

Course Objectives

  • Leadership and Management: Describe the chain of command and formal communication relationships, identify common leadership responsibilities, describe span of control and modular development, and describe the use of position titles.
  • Delegation of Authority and Management by Objectives: Describe scope of authority and the process by which authority is delegated. Management by objectives must be described and explained.
  • Functional Areas and Positions: Identify the ICS tools to manage an incident, demonstrate the function of organizational positions within ICS, and demonstrate the use of an ICS 201 form.
  • Briefings: Give an operational briefing and describe components of field, staff and section briefings/meetings.
  • Organizational Flexibility: Explain how the modular organization expands and contracts, complete a complexity analysis given a specific scenario, define the five types of incidents, and describe the importance of preparedness plans and agreements.
  • Transfer of Command: List the essential elements of information involved in transfer of command and describe a transfer-of-command process.

Prerequisites: IS-100.a


Incident Command System (ICS-300)
(18 Hours)
Intermediate Incident Command System

Course Overview:

The basic concepts presented in I-200 are expanded and discussed in detail. The single command organization is stressed and students will be exposed to resource management and the role and function of each ICS position, including air operations. Through a series of small group exercises students will be provided examples of how the essential system principles and components are used in incident planning. This course includes modules 7-11 of the National Interagency Incident Management System curriculum.

Audience

  • Federal, State, tribal, and local emergency management/response personnel determine who within their organizations requires ICS-300 training, based on local incident management organizational planning.
  • Typically, required personnel include all mid-level management, Federal, State, tribal, local, private-sector, and nongovernmental personnel, including persons serving as command staff, section chiefs, strike team leaders, task force leaders, unit leaders, division/group supervisors, branch directors, and multiagency coordination system/emergency operations center staff.

It is recommended that ICS-300 participants utilize their skills in an operational environment before taking ICS-400. This will provide necessary context and understanding of the skills they will develop when they take ICS-400

Course Objectives

  • ICS Fundamentals Review: Explain ICS staffing fundamentals and organization, including reporting and working relationships, information flow, and transfer of command. Match responsibility statements to each ICS organizational element.
  • Unified Command: Define and identify the primary features of unified command. Describe the unified command organization and functions in a multi-jurisdictional or multiagency incident. Demonstrate roles and reporting relationships under a unified command in single and multi-jurisdictional incidents.
  • Incident Management Operations: Describe methods and tools used to assess incident/event complexity. Describe the five steps in transferring and assuming incident command. Identify the key principles of incident management operations. Describe the process for developing incident objectives, strategies, and tactics.
  • Resource Management: Identify and describe four basic principles of resource management. Identify the basic steps involved in managing incident resources. Demonstrate proper use of ICS forms.
  • Planning Process: Identify the importance of and explain the differences between planning for incidents or events. Discuss major planning steps, including logistical concerns, cost-benefit analysis, situational understanding, plan development, implementation, and evaluation.
  • Demobilization, Transfer of Command, Closeout

Prerequisites: IS 200

 

Incident Command System (ICS-324) (4 hours)
Community Hurricane Preparedness

Course Overview

This computer-based course, Community Hurricane Preparedness, is to provide those involved in the decision making process for hurricanes with basic information about:

    • How hurricanes form
    • The hazards they pose
    • How the National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts future hurricane behavior
    • What tools and guiding principles can help emergency managers prepare their communities


Incident Command System (ICS-400)
(14 hours)
Advanced Incident Command System

Course Overview

This course emphasizes large scale organization and development for major incidents. Roles and relationships of the primary staff are examined as are the planning, operational, logistical, and fiscal considerations related to successful management of large and complex incidents. Students will be introduced to the concepts of area command and unified command, as well as the necessity for interagency coordination. This course includes modules 12-15 of the National Interagency Incident Management System curriculum.

Audience

  • Federal, State, tribal, and local emergency management/response personnel determine who within their organizations requires ICS-400 training, based on local incident management organizational planning.
  • Federal, State, tribal, and local emergency management/response personnel determine who within their organizations requires ICS-400 training, based on local incident management organizational planning.
  • It is recommended that ICS-300 participants utilize their skills in an operational environment before taking ICS-400. This will provide necessary context and understanding of the skills they will develop when they take ICS-400.

Course Objectives

  • Command and General Staff: Describe how unified command functions in a multi-jurisdictional or multiagency incident. List the major steps involved in the planning process. Describe issues that influence incident complexity and available analysis tools. Describe the primary guidelines and responsibilities of the Command and General Staff positions.
  • Major and/or Complex Incident/Event Management: Deputies and Assistants: List the primary factors affecting major and/or complex incidents and events. List the four expansion options for incident/event organization and describe their application.
  • Area Command: Define and list the principal advantages of area command, and describe how, where, and when area command would be established. Describe area command organization and identify six primary functions of area command.
  • Unified Command: Demonstrate knowledge of unified command structure and operations.
  • Multiagency Coordination: Describe the kinds of incident/event management problems that can occur due to a lack of multiagency coordination. Identify the major guidelines for establishing and using MAC groups and systems and their primary components. List the responsibilities of key elements with MACS.
  • Organizational Relationships: Describe the organizational relationships among area command, unified command, multi-entity coordination systems, and emergency operation centers.

Prerequisite: IS 300


Incident Command System (IS-700)
(4 hours)
National Incident Management System

Course Overview

On February 28, 2003, President Bush issued Homeland Security Presidential Directive-5. HSPD-5 directed the Secretary of Homeland Security to develop and administer a National Incident Management System (NIMS). NIMS provides a consistent nationwide template to enable all government, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together during domestic incidents. You can also find information about NIMS at http://www.fema.gov/nims/

This course introduces NIMS and explains the purpose, principles, key components and benefits of NIMS. The course also contains "Planning Activity" screens giving you an opportunity to complete some planning tasks during this course. The planning activity screens are printable so that you can use them after you complete the course.

Audience

All personnel with a direct role in emergency management/response must complete NIMS IS-700, including:

  • Executive level—political and government leaders; agency and organization administrators and department heads; personnel that fill ICS roles as unified commanders, incident commanders, Command Staff, or General Staff in either area command or single incidents; senior MACS personnel; senior emergency managers; and emergency operations center Command or General Staff.
  • Managerial level—agency and organization management between the executive level and first-level supervision; personnel who fill ICS roles as Branch Directors, Division/Group Supervisors, Unit Leaders, technical specialists, strike team and task force leaders, single resource leaders, and field supervisors; midlevel MACS personnel; EOC Section Chiefs, Branch Directors, Unit Leaders, and other emergency management/response personnel who require a higher level of ICS/NIMS training.
  • Responder level—emergency response providers and disaster workers, entry level to managerial level, including emergency medical service personnel; firefighters; medical personnel

Course Objectives

  • Concepts: Describe the key concepts and principles underlying the NIMS.
  • ICS: Identify the benefits of using ICS as the national incident management model.
  • Area Command: Describe when it is appropriate to institute an area command.
  • MACS: Describe when it is appropriate to institute a Multiagency Coordination System.
  • JIS: Describe the benefits of using a JIS for public information.
  • Preparedness: Identify the ways in which the NIMS affects preparedness.
  • Resource Management: Describe how the NIMS affects how resources are managed.
  • Communications: Describe the advantages of common communication and information management systems.
  • Technology: Explain how the NIMS influences technology and technology systems.
  • IC: Describe the purpose of the NIMS Integration Center.

 


Incident Command System (IS-701)
(16 hours)
NIMS Multiagency Coordination Systems

Audience

All personnel with a direct role in MACS and complex incident management or response must complete NIMS IS-701, including Federal, state, tribal, and local emergency management/response personnel—among them, incident commanders from all emergency management disciplines, private industry personnel responsible for coordination activities during a disaster, and Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster personnel.

Course Objectives

  • Concepts: Describe the key concepts and principles underlying NIMS.
  • ICS: Identify the benefits of using ICS as the national incident management model.
  • Area Command: Describe when it is appropriate to institute an area command.
  • MACS: Describe when it is appropriate to institute a Multiagency Coordination System.
  • JIS: Describe the benefits of using a JIS for public information.
  • Preparedness: Identify the ways in which the NIMS affects preparedness.
  • Resource Management: Describe how the NIMS affects how resources are managed.
  • Communications: Describe the advantages of common communication and information management systems.
  • Technology: Explain how the NIMS influences technology and technology systems.
  • NIC: Describe the purpose of the NIMS Integration Center


Incident Command System (IS-702)
(4 hours)
NIMS Public Information

Audience

The public information systems described in NIMS are designed to effectively manage public information at an incident, regardless of the size and complexity of the situation or the number of entities involved in the response. The goal of this course is to facilitate NIMS compliance by providing the basic information and tools needed to apply the NIMS public information systems and protocols during incident management.

This course is designed for local and State PIO.

Course Objectives

  • Joint Information System & Joint Information Center: Define NIMS public information systems, including onsite operations, the JIS and the JIC, and how they relate to each other.
  • JIS/JIC Process: Describe the JIS/JIC process of gathering, verifying, coordinating, and disseminating information by public information and incident management personnel.
  • Agency Participation: Identify each agency involved in given emergency situations and the role of each in the JIS to ensure that appropriate situational awareness information is communicated to the public.
  • Relationship to MACS: Define key terms related to public information systems, including the relationship with multiagency coordination systems and the field.
  • Resource Requirements: Identify typical resource requirements for public information systems.


Incident Command System (IS-703)
(16 hours)
NIMS Resource Management

Audience

All personnel with a significant resource management role in emergency management and incident response must complete NIMS IS-703

Course Objectives

  • Concepts and Principles: Establishing systems for describing, inventorying, requesting, and tracking resources. • Activation: Activating these systems prior to and during an incident.
  • Dispatch: Dispatching resources prior to and during an incident.
  • Deactivation: Deactivating or recalling resources during or after incidents.

Equivalencies: IS-703 supersedes G-276, Resource Management. For purposes of the Advanced Professional Series, those who have completed G-276 may still claim credit for it as an elective, or IS-703 will count toward that elective.


Incident Command System (IS-704)
(6 hours)
NIMS Communication and Information Management

Audience

IS-704 is designed for: members of the general public; emergency management/response personnel; elected officials of State, tribal, and local governments; appointed officials of State, tribal, and local governments; employees of the Department of Homeland Security; and employees of other Federal agencies.

Course Objectives

At the conclusion of this course, participants should be able to:

  • Define communications and information management at the local, tribal, State, and Federal levels of government to include the common operating picture and common communications and data standards.
  • Identify each agency involved in communications and information management activities before, during, and after a domestic incident.
  • Identify typical interoperability standards established by the NIMS Integration Center relative to communications and information management, including incident notification and situation reports, status reports, analytical data, geospatial information, wireless communications, and identification and authentication issues.
  • Define key terms related to communications and information management, including the relationship with multiagency coordination systems, public information, and the field.
  • Identify incident management communications issues relative to the incident command system for individual jurisdictions and for multiple jurisdictions.
  • Identify potential coordination and policy issues arising from an incident relative to communications and information


Incident Command System (IS-705)
(12 hours)
NIMS Preparedness

Audience

Federal, state, local and tribal emergency managers; first responders to include incident commanders from all emergency management disciplines; private industry personnel responsible for coordination activities during a disaster; and Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOAD) personnel.

Course Objectives

  • Define the preparedness component of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)
  • Define key concepts and principles of NIMS preparedness to include levels of capability and the use of a unified approach to preparedness
  • Identify the key preparedness concepts outlined in HSPD8 to include the National Preparedness Goal, the Target Capabilities List, the Universal Task List, and the National Planning Scenarios.
  • Identify each agency involved in NIMS Preparedness activities to ensure appropriate implementation of the preparedness cycle in advance of an incident.
  • Identify typical priorities for the NIMS Preparedness activities outlined in the NIMS document to include at minimum the following components: emergency policies, plans, procedures, resources, training, and exercises
  • Describe the importance of personnel qualifications and certification, equipment certification, mutual aid agreements, and publications management to NIMS Preparedness

Prerequisites: IS-700 and ICS-100


Incident Command System (IS-706)
(3 hours)
NIMS Intrastate Mutual Aid, An Introduction

Audience

This course is designed for State, local, and tribal emergency response and coordination personnel and takes approximately two and a half hours to complete.

Course Objectives

  • Purpose: Describe the purpose, benefits, and uses of mutual aid and assistance.
  • Relation to NIMS: Explain how mutual aid and assistance agreements relate to NIMS.
  • Involved Information Identify what information should be included in a mutual aid and assistance agreement.
  • Processes required: Explain the process for developing mutual aid and assistance agreements.
  • Elements of Mutual Aid and Assistance: Identify the elements of a mutual aid and assistance operational plan.

Prerequisites: The prerequisite for this course is IS-700:


Incident Command System (IS-707)
(4 hours)
NIMS Resource Typing

Audience
Federal, state, local and tribal emergency managers; first responders to include incident commanders from all emergency management disciplines; private industry personnel responsible for coordination activities during a disaster; and Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (VOAD) personnel.

 

  • Course Objectives
  • Define NIMS Resource Typing Definitions
  • Use NIMS Resource Typing Definitions to request and receive appropriate resources during disasters
  • Use resource database management software program in support of response operations
  • Demonstrate understanding of criteria for recommending non-identified resources for inclusion in the NIMS Guide 0001 – National NIMS Resource Typing Criteria

Prerequisites: IS-700 and ICS-100


Incident Command System (IS-800.B)
(4 hours)
National Response Plan

Course Overview
The National Response Plan, or NRP, describes how the Federal Government will work in concert with State, local, and tribal governments and the private sector to respond to disasters.

The course introduces participants to the concepts and principles of the National Response Framework.

Audience

All Federal, State, tribal, and local emergency management/response personnel whose primary responsibility is emergency management must complete this training. Specifically, officials who must take the course include:

  • Personnel in Federal departments and agencies with emergency management and incident response responsibilities under the NRF.
  • Officials in State and Territorial governments with emergency management and incident response responsibilities, personnel from emergency management agencies, and personnel from agencies who support and interact with the NRF's 15 Emergency Support Functions and Support Annexes.
  • Officials in tribal entities and local jurisdictions with overall emergency management responsibilities as dictated by law or ordinance, officials with overall emergency management responsibilities through delegation, and officials primarily involved in emergency planning.

Course Objectives

  • Purpose: The course introduces participants to the concepts and principles of the NRF and the response doctrine.
  • Roles and Responsibilities: Describe the roles and responsibilities of entities as specified in the NRF and actions that support national response.
  • Organization: Identify the organizational structure used for NRF coordination. Describe the field-level organizations and teams activated under the NRF.
  • Incident Management: Identify the incident management activities addressed by the NRF to include multiagency coordination.
  • Planning: Describes how planning relates to national preparedness.


Incident Command System (IS-1900)
(4 hours)
NDMS Federal Coordinating Center Operations Course

Course Overview

IS-1900, NDMS Federal Coordinating Center Operations Course provides training to address the needs of Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs). 

Audience

  • The primary audience of the NDMS Federal Coordinating Center Operations Course are FCC Directors as well as FCC Coordinators and staff.  Secondary audiences include others who support NDMS patient movement and definitive care components, such as: 
  • PRA Steering Committee members
  • DoD teams and personnel (e.g., Air Force Aeromedical Evacuation Liaison Teams and Joint Regional Medical Planners)
  • Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Response Team members (e.g., Disaster Medical Assistance Teams)
  • Department and agency headquarters personnel (e.g., DHS Operations Support Center personnel)
  • Department and agency field management personnel (e.g., Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Incident Response Coordination Team (IRCT))

Course Objectives

  • Provide the training necessary to ensure all FCCs as being proficient to perform their duties.
  • Provide flexible training for FCCs which will not sacrifice training quality or standards.
  • Provide a forum for FCC development through individual participation.
  • Acclimate FCCs to function during incidents of national significance.
  • Acclimate FCCs to function in support of the DoD.




logoCall us at 239-481-3777 or email us at Frank@ussafety.us to register for training courses.    Traning Calender

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